Original Research

Classroom intervention to change peers’ attitudes towards children who stutter: A feasibility study

Harsha Kathard, Freda Walters, Kareemah Frieslaar, Thembeka Mhlongo, Melissa Rhoode, Raeesa Shaboodien, Julia Weidmann, Nicole Zimmerman, Amy Zoetmulder, Fatemah Camroodien-Surve
South African Journal of Communication Disorders | Vol 61, No 1 | a80 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajcd.v61i1.80 | © 2014 Harsha Kathard, Freda Walters, Kareemah Frieslaar, Thembeka Mhlongo, Melissa Rhoode, Raeesa Shaboodien, Julia Weidmann, Nicole Zimmerman, Amy Zoetmulder, Fatemah Camroodien-Surve | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 18 March 2014 | Published: 03 December 2014

About the author(s)

Harsha Kathard, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Freda Walters, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Kareemah Frieslaar, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town
Thembeka Mhlongo, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town
Melissa Rhoode, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town
Raeesa Shaboodien, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town
Julia Weidmann, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town
Nicole Zimmerman, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town
Amy Zoetmulder, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town
Fatemah Camroodien-Surve, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Before interventions are implemented, the potential treatment benefit must be determined.Objectives: The primary objective of this feasibility study was to assess if peers’ attitudes towards children who stutter (CWS) change one month after the administration of the Classroom Communication Resource (CCR). The secondary objectives of the study were to determine if differences in peer attitudes were related to gender and to previous exposure to a person who stutters.

Method: The study used a cluster randomised control trial design. The study included 211 Grade 7 participants from schools in the Cape Town Metropole. The CCR intervention was administered to 97 participants in the experimental group, whilst 114 participants in the control group did not receive the intervention. The Stuttering Resource Outcome Measure(SROM) used as the outcome measure during pre- and post-test period. STATISTICA was used for in-depth data analysis.

Results: An overall positive direction of change in scores was observed for the experimental group compared with the control group. However, the magnitude of change in the experimental group was not statistically significant (p = 0.2683). Male and female participants did not differ significantly in their scores on the SROM across pre-test and post-test periods. Participants who had exposure to individuals who stutter had significantly more positive scores on the SROM in the pre-test and post-test periods compared to those who had no direct exposure to stuttering.

Conclusion: This result indicated the beginning of positive attitude change which may be attributed to the intervention. Further investigation is warranted.


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Crossref Citations

1. Reliability, validity, and turkish adaptation of the peer attitudes toward children who stutter scale
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