Original Research

Speech processing and production in two-year-old children acquiring isiXhosa: A tale of two children

Michelle Pascoe, Kate Rossouw, Laura Fish, Charne Jansen, Natalie Manley, Michelle Powell, Loren Rosen
South African Journal of Communication Disorders | Vol 63, No 2 | a134 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajcd.v63i2.134 | © 2016 Michelle Pascoe, Kate Rossouw, Laura Fish, Charne Jansen, Natalie Manley, Michelle Powell, Loren Rosen | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 23 July 2015 | Published: 20 May 2016

About the author(s)

Michelle Pascoe, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Kate Rossouw, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Laura Fish, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Charne Jansen, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Natalie Manley, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Michelle Powell, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Loren Rosen, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa


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Abstract

We investigated the speech processing and production of 2-year-old children acquiring isiXhosa in South Africa. Two children (2 years, 5 months; 2 years, 8 months) are presented as single cases. Speech input processing, stored phonological knowledge and speech output are described, based on data from auditory discrimination, naming, and repetition tasks. Both children were approximating adult levels of accuracy in their speech output, although naming was constrained by vocabulary. Performance across tasks was variable: One child showed a relative strength with repetition, and experienced most difficulties with auditory discrimination. The other performed equally well in naming and repetition, and obtained 100% for her auditory task. There is limited data regarding typical development of isiXhosa, and the focus has mainly been on speech production. This exploratory study describes typical development of isiXhosa using a variety of tasks understood within a psycholinguistic framework. We describe some ways in which speech and language therapists can devise and carry out assessment with children in situations where few formal assessments exist, and also detail the challenges of such work.

Keywords: psycholinguistic assessment; phonology; psycholinguistic framework; naming; repetition; auditory discrimination


Keywords

psycholinguistic assessment; phonology; psycholinguistic framework; naming; repetition; auditory discrimination

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