Original Research

Comparison of the South African Spondaic and CID W-1 wordlists for measuring speech recognition threshold

Tanya Hanekom, Maggi Soer, Lidia Pottas
South African Journal of Communication Disorders | Vol 62, No 1 | a97 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajcd.v62i1.97 | © 2015 Tanya Hanekom, Maggi Soer, Lidia Pottas | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 08 July 2014 | Published: 26 June 2015

About the author(s)

Tanya Hanekom, Department of Speech-Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa
Maggi Soer, Department of Speech-Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa
Lidia Pottas, Department of Speech-Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: The home language of most audiologists in South Africa is either English or Afrikaans, whereas most South Africans speak an African language as their home language. The use of an English wordlist, the South African Spondaic (SAS) wordlist, which is familiar to the English Second Language (ESL) population, was developed by the author for testing the speech recognition threshold (SRT) of ESL speakers.

 

Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the pure-tone average (PTA)/SRT correlation results of ESL participants when using the SAS wordlist (list A) and the CID W-1 spondaic wordlist (list B – less familiar; list C – more familiar CID W-1 words).

 

Method: A mixed-group correlational, quantitative design was adopted. PTA and SRT measurements were compared for lists A, B and C for 101 (197 ears) ESL participants with normal hearing or a minimal hearing loss (<26 dBHL; mean age 33.3).

 

Results: The Pearson correlation analysis revealed a strong PTA/SRT correlation when using list A (right 0.65; left 0.58) and list C (right 0.63; left 0.56). The use of list B revealed weak correlations (right 0.30; left 0.32). Paired sample t-tests indicated a statistically significantly stronger PTA/SRT correlation when list A was used, rather than list B or list C, at a 95% level of confidence.

 

Conclusions: The use of the SAS wordlist yielded a stronger PTA/SRT correlation than the use of the CID W-1 wordlist, when performing SRT testing on South African ESL speakers with normal hearing, or minimal hearing loss (<26 dBHL).


Keywords

Speech Recognition Threshold (SRT); English second language (ESL), South Africa, South African Spondaic wordlist; CID W-1 wordlist; familiarity

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Crossref Citations

1. The internal and external consistency of a speech reception threshold test for isiZulu speakers with normal hearing sensitivity
Seema Panday, Harsha Kathard, Mershen Pillay, Wayne Wilson
South African Journal of Communication Disorders  vol: 65  issue: 1  year: 2018  
doi: 10.4102/sajcd.v65i1.556