Original Research

Clinical implications of a neuropsychological approach to aphasia

Aura Kagan, Michael Saling, Margaret M. Wahlhaus
South African Journal of Communication Disorders | Vol 30, No 1 | a664 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajcd.v30i1.664 | © 2019 Aura Kagan, Michael Saling, Margaret M. Wahlhaus | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 06 August 2019 | Published: 31 December 1983

About the author(s)

Aura Kagan, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa
Michael Saling, Department of Psychology, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa
Margaret M. Wahlhaus, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa

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Abstract

This paper deals with the clinical implications arising out of a study designed to evaluate Luria's approach to the cerebral organisation of higher mental functions such as language. The research took the form of four in-depth case studies of aphasic patients and involved a comparison of neuropsychological predictions as to the site-of-lesion with radiological findings (cranial computerised tomographic scanning). Correspondence was felt to be good in most instances, indicating that Luria's theory provides a valid framework within which to relate clinical symptomatology and focal brain damage. The fact that Luria places clinical practice on a firm theoretical foundation is seen as being advantageous and is discussed in relation to assessment and therapy.

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