Original Research

Compilation of a preliminary checklist for the differential diagnosis of neurogenic stuttering

Mariska Lundie, Zandria Erasmus, Ursula Zsilavecz, Jeannie van der Linde
South African Journal of Communication Disorders | Vol 61, No 1 | a64 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajcd.v61i1.64 | © 2014 Mariska Lundie, Zandria Erasmus, Ursula Zsilavecz, Jeannie van der Linde | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 26 February 2014 | Published: 27 June 2014

About the author(s)

Mariska Lundie, Department Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa
Zandria Erasmus, Department Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa
Ursula Zsilavecz, Department Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa
Jeannie van der Linde, Department Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: Neurogenic stuttering (NS) is the most frequently occurring acquired form of stuttering in children and adults. This form of stuttering is primarily caused by neurological incidents. Owing to controversies with regard to similarities between developmental stuttering (DS) and NS symptomatology, differential diagnosis is problematic. Differential diagnosis will guide the appropriate management of persons who stutter (PWS).

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and highlight the characteristics of NS in order to compile a preliminary checklist for accurate diagnosis and intervention.

Method: An explorative, applied mixed method, multiple case study research design was followed. Purposive sampling was used to select four participants. A comprehensive assessment battery was compiled for data collection.

Results: The results revealed a distinct pattern of core stuttering behaviours in NS, although discrepancies existed regarding stuttering severity and frequency. It was also found that DS and NS can co-occur. The case history and the core stuttering pattern are important considerations during differential diagnosis, as these are the only consistent characteristics in people with NS.

Conclusion: It is unlikely that all the symptoms of NS are present in an individual. The researchers scrutinised the findings of this study and the findings of previous literature to compile a potentially workable checklist.


Keywords

Neurogenic stuttering; developmental stuttering; differential diagnostic checklist; stuttering

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