Clinical Perspective

Towards a South African model of language-based learning disability

Xoli Mazibuko, Penelope Flack, Jane Kvalsvig
South African Journal of Communication Disorders | Vol 66, No 1 | a634 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajcd.v66i1.634 | © 2019 Xoli Mazibuko, Penelope Flack, Jane Kvalsvig | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 17 March 2019 | Published: 22 November 2019

About the author(s)

Xoli Mazibuko, Discipline of Speech Language Pathology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
Penelope Flack, Discipline of Speech Language Pathology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
Jane Kvalsvig, School of Public Health, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: This conceptual article is inspired by the first phase of a doctoral research project that aimed to develop and validate a bilingual language assessment test for IsiZulu-English-speaking children in grades 1, 2 and 3 with language-based learning disabilities (L-b LDs) in South Africa.

Objectives: Phase 1, systematic literature review, pretesting and formulating of a theoretical framework, with the aim to determine early indicators of L-b LDs; this is important for developing a clinical language test as it determines its constructs.

Method: Thematic analysis was used to develop the models.

Results: This article reviews the literature on indicators and definitions of L-b LD, introduces models that were developed in the study to conceptualise L-b LD and discusses implications for language test development.

Conclusion: The models provided in this article conceptualise L-b LD and identify its early indicators. The application of these models in both educational and clinical settings is proposed for differentiation of L-b LD.


Keywords

clinical assessments; early indicators; language-based learning disability; learning disability; systems approach.

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