Original Research

Configurations of self-identity formations of adults who stutter

Harsha Kathard, Vivienne Norman, Mershen Pillay
South African Journal of Communication Disorders | Vol 57, No 1 | a49 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajcd.v57i1.49 | © 2010 Harsha Kathard, Vivienne Norman, Mershen Pillay | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 19 February 2010 | Published: 10 December 2010

About the author(s)

Harsha Kathard, University f Cape Town, South Africa
Vivienne Norman, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Mershen Pillay, University of Cape Town, South Africa

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Abstract

The aims of this paper are twofold: Firstly, to describe the configuration of self-identity formations evident across and within research stories of adults living with stuttering; and secondly, to discuss the clinical implications of these findings. The study on which this paper is based used life history narratives to describe the types, processes and configurations of self-identity formations of adults who stuttered since childhood. Through open-ended, in-depth interviews 7 participants shared their experiences of living with stuttering. The interviews were analysed at a first level using narrative analysis and at a second level to further describe the types, processes and configurations of self-identity formations evident in the stories. The findings on configurations of self-identity formations were that the two types of self-identity formations Able and DisOther were present in singular and dual configurations. The dual self-identity formations occurred in co-existing, competing and coalescing relationships within particular time periods in their stories. The clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

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Crossref Citations

1. To be or not to be: Stuttering and the human costs of being “un-disabled”
Brian Watermeyer, Harsha Kathard
International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology  vol: 18  issue: 1  first page: 11  year: 2016  
doi: 10.3109/17549507.2015.1060528